Curator of Curiosities

Feb 23

[video]

Feb 20

An Inconvenient Child -

the-feature:

My six-year-old son was removed from school as a danger to others. His crime? A disability you could find in any classroom.

[video]

Feb 17

“Do those words matter? Of course they do, because they underpin an idiom that acts to remove the authority, the force, even the humour from what women have to say. It’s an idiom that effectively repositions women back into the domestic sphere (people ‘whinge’ over things like the washing up); it trivialises their words, or it ‘re-privatises’ them. Contrast the ‘deep-voiced’ man with all the connotations of profundity that the simple word ‘deep’ brings. It is still the case that when listeners hear a female voice, they don’t hear a voice that connotes authority; or rather they have not learned how to hear authority in it; they don’t hear muthos. And it isn’t just voice: you can add in the craggy or wrinkled faces that signal mature wisdom in the case of a bloke, but ‘past-my-use-by-date’ in the case of a woman.” — Mary Beard, “The Public Voice of Women,” London Review of Books

Feb 11

“If conversation hearts are any indication of our capacity for romantic sentimentality, then we are a decidedly unsentimental bunch. But it’s not our fault: Valentine’s Day itself is probably to blame. Before the 1840s, Americans were largely free from the shackles of Valentine’s Day’s tyrannical romance. February was reserved for celebrating the birth of possibly the least romantic person on earth: George Washington.” —

A Short History of the Really Bad Valentine Missive, The Hairpin

http://thehairpin.com/2014/02/a-short-history-of-the-really-bad-valentine-missive

Feb 10

Handmade Valentine, American, 1806
via the Winterthur Collection.

Handmade Valentine, American, 1806

via the Winterthur Collection.

Feb 07

“These days, the idea of being a “good reader” or a “good critic” is very much out of fashion — not because we believe that such creatures do not exist, but because we all identify as both. The machine of consumerism is designed to encourage us all to believe that our preferences are significant and self-revealing; that a taste for Coke over Pepsi, or for KFC over McDonald’s, means something about us; that our tastes comprise, in sum, a kind of aggregate expression of our unique selfhood.” — Eleanor Catton, On Literature and Elitism, Metro

Feb 06

“I imagine you are both enthusiastic and implacable, as you are at once sagacious and careless; you know much and discover much, but you are in such a hurry to tell it all you never give yourself time to think how your recklessness may affect others; and, what is more, if you knew how it did affect them, you would not much care.” —

Letter from Charlotte Bronte to G.H. Lewes (Mr. George Eliot), dated January 19, 1850.

This is Bronte’s response to Lewes, a book critic among other things, after he “outed” her as a woman. Prior to this, she had published as Currer Bell both to protect her identity and so that her novels would be met with the same criticisms as her male counterparts. 

Nobody rebukes like Charlotte Bronte.

101 Women Artists Who Got Wikipedia Pages This Week -

Feb 04

thegetty:


"If this photograph now appears lifelike to you, you had better reconsider what it means to be alive here and now." —Hiroshi Sugimoto

#NowOnView at the Getty, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Past Tense.
Queen Victoria, 1999, Hiroshi Sugimoto, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Oh, I so would like to see this exhibition.

thegetty:

"If this photograph now appears lifelike to you, you had better reconsider what it means to be alive here and now." Hiroshi Sugimoto

#NowOnView at the Getty, Hiroshi Sugimoto: Past Tense.

Queen Victoria, 1999, Hiroshi Sugimoto, gelatin silver print. Courtesy of Fraenkel Gallery, San Francisco. © Hiroshi Sugimoto

Oh, I so would like to see this exhibition.