Curator of Curiosities

Apr 02

Why Are There So Few Prominent Women in the Art World? -

moma:

New on the Design & Violence blog: Google’s Digital Attack Map tracks network invasions around the world. [Fernanda Viégas, Martin Wattenberg, Colin McMillen, CJ Adams. Google Ideas. Google Big Picture Team. Arbor Networks, Inc. “DigitalAttackMap.com.” Oct 21, 2013. Image courtesy of Google Ideas, DDoS data © 2014 and Arbor Networks, Inc.]

moma:

New on the Design & Violence blog: Google’s Digital Attack Map tracks network invasions around the world. 

[Fernanda Viégas, Martin Wattenberg, Colin McMillen, CJ Adams. Google Ideas. Google Big Picture Team. Arbor Networks, Inc. “DigitalAttackMap.com.” Oct 21, 2013. Image courtesy of Google Ideas, DDoS data © 2014 and Arbor Networks, Inc.]

Mar 31

gallerytally:

Meg Madison

gallerytally:

Meg Madison

Mar 25

"The annals of history are filled with anecdotes of musical nuns behaving badly: cross-dressing to attend the opera, burning down convents, and, worse, making money from lavish musical performances. But the moral panic over singing sisters stemmed from idle gossip that, behind shrouded by the walls of the convent, nuns engaged in some downright dirty behavior. If popular art was any indication (see above), then the brides of Christ weren’t nearly as virginal as they claimed. In between Satanic singing, they did what any woman with time to kill would: they harvested penises and hooked up with monks. The link between the lurid nature of song and licentiousness was unambiguous”
Our Enduring Love of Singing Nuns, The Hairpin

"The annals of history are filled with anecdotes of musical nuns behaving badly: cross-dressing to attend the opera, burning down convents, and, worse, making money from lavish musical performances. But the moral panic over singing sisters stemmed from idle gossip that, behind shrouded by the walls of the convent, nuns engaged in some downright dirty behavior. If popular art was any indication (see above), then the brides of Christ weren’t nearly as virginal as they claimed. In between Satanic singing, they did what any woman with time to kill would: they harvested penises and hooked up with monks. The link between the lurid nature of song and licentiousness was unambiguous”

Our Enduring Love of Singing Nuns, The Hairpin

Mar 20

“In the case of [L’Wren] Scott, the Times seems to have repeated the same mistake, emphasizing the importance of her relationships over her talents. Perhaps editors were so enamored with Jagger’s fame or the potential click-bait of his name that Scott’s erasure seemed easy enough. The irony is that Scott, an “entirely self-made” businesswoman, shied away from questions about her famous partner, preferring instead to talk about her work.” — L’Wren Scott, and the awful truth about women’s obituaries via The Week 

Mar 18

nprbooks:

Today’s top book news item:
A weeks-old campaign to get U.K. publishers to stop labeling children’s books by gender is garnering support from members of Parliament, authors and booksellers, including the major retailer Waterstones. The literary editor of The Independent on Sunday pledged that the newspaper would not review gender-specific books, writing, “Any Girls’ Book of Boring Princesses that crosses my desk will go straight into the recycling pile along with every Great Big Book of Snot for Boys.”
Organizers of the “Let Books Be Books” campaign, which is a part of the larger “Let Toys Be Toys” movement, state on their website:

"How can a story be only for a girl, or a sticker be just for a boy? But titles like The Beautiful Girls’ Book of Colouring or Illustrated Classics for Boys are on the shelves in toyshops, bookstores and supermarkets around the UK and Ireland. These books send out very limiting messages to children about what kinds of things are appropriate for girls or for boys. Blue covers, with themes of action and adventure, robots, space, trucks and pirates contrast with a riot of pink sparkles, fairies, princesses, flowers and butterflies. But real children’s interests are a lot more diverse, and more interesting, than that.”

nprbooks:

Today’s top book news item:

A weeks-old campaign to get U.K. publishers to stop labeling children’s books by gender is garnering support from members of Parliament, authors and booksellers, including the major retailer Waterstones. The literary editor of The Independent on Sunday pledged that the newspaper would not review gender-specific books, writing, “Any Girls’ Book of Boring Princesses that crosses my desk will go straight into the recycling pile along with every Great Big Book of Snot for Boys.”

Organizers of the “Let Books Be Books” campaign, which is a part of the larger “Let Toys Be Toys” movement, state on their website:

"How can a story be only for a girl, or a sticker be just for a boy? But titles like The Beautiful Girls’ Book of Colouring or Illustrated Classics for Boys are on the shelves in toyshops, bookstores and supermarkets around the UK and Ireland. These books send out very limiting messages to children about what kinds of things are appropriate for girls or for boys. Blue covers, with themes of action and adventure, robots, space, trucks and pirates contrast with a riot of pink sparkles, fairies, princesses, flowers and butterflies. But real children’s interests are a lot more diverse, and more interesting, than that.”

Mar 06

[video]

Feb 27

Physician using his qualifications to take advantage of their women patients or of the public. Coloured lithographs, ca. 1852. via the Wellcome Collection

Physician using his qualifications to take advantage of their women patients or of the public. Coloured lithographs, ca. 1852. via the Wellcome Collection

Feb 25

I Looked at the 2,500 Lean In Stock Photos So You Don’t Have To

Feb 23

[video]